Why and how do we have to clean our closets?

 How about we do a little spring cleaning? Sorting through our clothes so we can get dressed again?
 Lighten your mind by lightening your interior? And why not!

We’ve all had the thought, “I’ve got nothing to wear.” And yet our closets are overflowing with clothes that we have long since forgotten about.

Who hasn’t found a brand new sweater or pair of jeans? Who doesn’t complain about wearing the same old jeans when a pile of new trousers is piling up and we have 18 of the same black T-shirt?

So we take advantage of the spring to make room, we air out. Because when we tidy up, we can see more clearly and breathe better!

Marie Kondo
How to apply it to our closet?

Do you know the Thred Up app? It calculates the carbon footprint of your dressing by answering a few simple questions:

DO THE TEST

Marie Kondo Method: tidying up to be happier!

For Japanese consultant Marie Kondo, author of the world bestseller The Magic of Tidying up and heroine of a new reality TV show on Netflix, an orderly home is the first step towards well-being. Or rather “wellness”.

No more Zen and feng shui! Marie Kondo follows this simple philosophy: keep only what brings you joy in the present moment. Everything else should be thrown away or given to good deeds. And here she aims at everything that clutters us unnecessarily: clothes that are never worn, too tight or worn out that we will never put back on.

spring cleaning

Once we figured it out, we act.

What is the “wardrobe capsule“? It’s to de-clutter your wardrobe, to buy less but better, and to think of your wardrobe in its entirety by keeping only the pieces that fit together. You’ll come out with a unique style because a trend will inevitably emerge! No more worries in the morning to get dressed desperately looking for what to match those pants or dress! So much time saved! For more info on how to build your wardrobe capsule and reduce your wardrobe to 50 timeless pieces: https://www.whowhatwear.co.uk/how-to-capsule-wardrobe

Are you familiar with the Pareto principle? It states that “about 80% of the effects are the result of 20% of the causes“. Which in our case means that we put the same 20% of clothes on 80% of the time.

So what if we gave the other 80% a second life and a chance to please someone else? And who knows, you might find a forgotten nugget!

For the first thing, take out of your closets all the pieces you haven’t put on for more than a year. Then ask yourself if you’ll enjoy putting it back on. If you didn’t use it last season, there’s little chance you’ll use it this year.

Same goes for that old, slightly faded shirt, or that slightly slouchy sweater. If you have any doubts, chances are you’ll never wear it again. And I’m not even talking about the old pants that you hope to get into again (yeah yeah, you know what I mean). If you’re having any difficulty throwing it away, take the test: put it on standby and wait a few months. You still haven’t worn it? Get rid of it!

time for a spring cleaning
Once you made the selection, give in priority! Ok, but to whom?

Those old items you will sell for 5 euros and will have asked for your energy in the negotiation, the expedition… won’t it rather make someone happy somewhere else ?

Give around you, someone will necessarily need it or want it. You can even barter between friends and give life back to certain pieces. It’s a great opportunity to organize an evening with friends and why not find nuggets that no longer bring joy to others!

You can also put your clothes in containers and thus participate in a circular production line. Some clothes can be resold at low prices. Then the more worn-out clothes will be used as the basis for creating new pieces and will be “upcycled”.

Indeed, 95% of textile fibres could be recycled, even the most damaged ones. 

 

If you want to avoid depositing them in a relay point: as we now know, the textile giants are waging a relentless war to get these materials back. This will then enable them to benefit from subsidies and acquire raw materials at lower cost.

Beware, contrary to what one might think, the clothes deposited in the containers are not given to the the most needy but resold at lower cost in second-hand shops.

time to spring cleaning

If you prefer that your clothes benefit the poorest, opt instead for a donation to associations. Find out about those who are looking for donations of clothes in good condition to resell immediately, or give to charity shops (https://www.charityretail.org.uk/find-a-charity-shop/).

The false good idea: Did you know that H&M takes back your old clothes in exchange for a voucher to spend in their store. So you’ll tell me, “Why a false good idea?” Because after having recovered your clothes H&M will then sell them to I:Collect, a multinational recycling specialist. So it has no social or solidarity vocation but purely economic. Or how fast fashion feeds fast fashion at lower cost. But let’s pass and salute the effort.

Finally we realize that giving a clothing is like giving money. To whom do we want to give it, why and according to which model? To feed the multinationals in exchange for a voucher that will be used to refill our wardrobes? Or do we give in a real spirit of generosity by participating in a solidarity economy that creates jobs and happiness?

vide dressing
Last but not least: resale. And the possibilities available to us today are numerous. So why deprive ourselves of them?

Vinted, Vestiaire Collective, Ebay, many mobile applications now make our lives easier from every point of view and in the space of 3 clicks. Think also of the empty neighborhood dressing rooms, there are many of them and are easily found through social networks.

IT’S UP TO YOU!